Dependency Injection Using C# Programming

R M Shahidul Islam Shahed
3 min readJul 7, 2023

Dependency Injection (DI) is a design pattern and a fundamental concept in software development, including C# programming. It allows for loose coupling and separation of concerns by enabling the injection of dependencies into a class or component from an external source.

In DI, the dependencies of a class are “injected” into it from external sources rather than being created internally within the class itself. This helps to decouple the classes and makes them more reusable, testable, and modular.

Dependency Injection Using C# Programming

In DI, instead of creating and managing dependencies within a class or component, the dependencies are provided externally, typically through constructor parameters or property setters. This decouples the class from its dependencies, making it more flexible, testable, and maintainable.

The benefits of using DI in C# include:

  1. Decoupling: DI helps to decouple components by removing direct dependencies and promoting dependency inversion. This makes it easier to modify, replace, or test individual components without affecting the entire system.
  2. Testability: With DI, dependencies can be easily mocked or replaced with test doubles during unit testing. This allows for more comprehensive and isolated testing, as dependencies can be controlled and manipulated as needed.
  3. Reusability: By injecting dependencies, components become more reusable. They can be used in different contexts or scenarios simply by providing different implementations of the dependencies.
  4. Maintainability: DI improves code maintainability by reducing the complexity and dependencies within classes. Changes to dependencies can be made in a single place, making it easier to update or replace them without affecting the entire codebase.
  5. Flexibility: DI enables runtime configuration and dynamic behavior. Dependencies can be easily swapped or configured based on different runtime conditions or environments.

Here’s a simple example of using Dependency Injection in C#:

Let’s say we have two classes, UserService and EmailService. The UserService requires an instance of EmailService sending email notifications.

public interface IEmailService
{
void…

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